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Warner Bros. Home Entertainment logo
Warner Bros. Home Entertainment
General information
Caption
Other Names WCI Home Video
Warner Home Video
Warner Bros. Home Entertainment
Warner Bros. Home Entertainment Group
Type Home video division of Warner Bros.
Founded 1978
Defunct
Predecessor WCI Home Video
Warner Home Video
Successor
Founder
Location Burbank, California, United States
Key People Ronald J. Sanders, president
Industry Home video
Served area
Products Physical and digital video releases
Owner Warner Bros. (Time Warner)
No. of Employees
Parent Warner Communications (1978-1990)
Time Warner (1990-2001; 2003-present)
AOL Time Warner (2001-2003)
Homepage

Warner Bros. Home Entertainment (formerly called as WCI Home Video and Warner Home Video) is the home video distribution division of Warner Bros. Home Entertainment Group, itself part of Time Warner. It was founded in 1978 as WCI Home Video (for Warner Communications, Inc.). The company launched in the United States with twenty films on Betamax and VHS videocassettes in late 1979. The company later expanded its line to include additional titles throughout 1979 and 1980.

Warner Home Video is a business unit of Warner Bros. Home Entertainment, along with Warner Bros. Digital and Warner Bros. Interactive Entertainment.

Catalog Edit

The company releases titles from the film and television library of Warner Bros. Entertainment, as well as programs from other Time Warner companies. Currently, they also serve distributor for television and/or movie products released by DC Comics (inducing Batman), Lifetime, HBO, CNN, Cartoon Network, Adult Swim, Turner Entertainment Co. (ex. MGM's pre-1986 library), RKO Pictures), truTV (known as Court TV until 2008), TCM, the BBC in the U.S., TNT, American Girl, King Features, Sesame Workshop, Lego, National Geographic Society in the U.S., and product from the NBA, NFL, and NHL.

History Edit

The company launched in the United States with twenty films on Betamax and VHS videocassettes in late 1979. The company later expanded its line to include additional titles throughout 1979 and 1980.

Some early releases were time-compressed in order to save tape time and money and to compensate for long-playing cassettes being unavailable in the early days of home video. One example was 1978's Superman in which the film was released in a 127-minute format, compared to its 143-minute theatrical release. In addition, early film-to-video transfers of films from WCI were noted for being in poor quality, compared to modern day video releases. By the end of 1980, the quality of transfers had improved.

The company was noted in its early days for releases in big cardboard boxes that opened like a book, colored in black, with cast credits on the inside. Some early releases under the Warner Home Video name also used this design. In early 1981, the company switched to plastic clamshell cases, with a multicolor design, with a few releases using the cardboard boxes and the multicolor designs, and to cardboard sleeves in 1985 for packaging, eliminating plastic cases by 1986. In the mid 1990s, the studio revived the use of plastic cases for a handful of releases from Warner Bros. Family Entertainment.

Warner Bros. began to branch out into the videodisc market, licensing titles to MCA DiscoVision and RCA's SelectaVision videodisc formats, allowing both companies to market and distribute the films under their labels. By 1985, Warner was releasing material under their own label in both formats. Titles from Warner Home Video were and continue to be distributed and manufactured by Roadshow Home Video in Australia and New Zealand because of its film counterpart's films released by Village Roadshow.

RentalsEdit

Warner also experimented with the "rental-only" market for videos, a method also used by 20th Century Fox for their first release of Star Wars in 1982. Two known films released in this manner were Superman II and Excalibur. Other films released for rental use include Dirty Harry, The Enforcer, Prince of the City, and Sharky's Machine.

Notable firsts, Warner Archive Collection and distributionEdit

In 1997, Warner Home Video was one of the first major American distributors for the new DVD format, by releasing Twister on DVD. Warner executive Warren Lieberfarb is often seen as "the father of DVD". Lieberfarb's successor, Warner Executive James Cardwell was recognized in paving the way for WHV’s strategic positioning in next generation technologies such as High Definition DVD, electronic sell-through and portable video. In 2003, Warner Home Video became the first home video releasing company to release movies only on DVD with no VHS equivalent.

On September 26, 2006, Warner Home Video became the first company to release a title in three formats on the same day and date with the home release of The Lake House on DVD, Blu-ray and HD DVD. With Paramount Home Entertainment switching from neutral in the high definition video camp to solely to HD DVD in September 2007, Warner Home Video was at the time the only major distributor to support both high definition formats, though this changed at the end of May 2008. From June 2008, Warner Home Video released new high definition content on Blu-ray only, becoming the last major Hollywood studio to drop HD DVD after Toshiba discontinued the HD DVD format.

In 2009, Warner Home Video introduced the Warner Archive Collection, which allows the public to order custom-made DVDs of rarely seen films and TV series from the Warner and Turner libraries. The films are also available as digital downloads. Warner Archive DVDs and downloads can be ordered online on Warner's website, on Amazon.com or Turner Classic Movies-affiliated DVD website Movies Unlimited (Although Movies Unlimited sells these archive titles, it usually takes 2–3 months before the DVD is available for order after Warners releases it on their website.)

In October 2012, Paramount Home Entertainment and Warner Home Video signed a distribution deal, allowing Warner Bros. to gain U.S. and Canadian DVD, Blu-ray, UltraViolet, Flixster, and DVD-manufacturing-on-demand distribution rights to over 600 Paramount Pictures titles as well as new Paramount Pictures titles. The deal came into effect as of January 1, 2013.

GalleryEdit

As WCI Home VideoEdit

As Warner Home VideoEdit

As Warner Bros. Home EntertainmentEdit

External linksEdit


v - e - d
TimeWarner 2004
Board of directors

Herbert M. Allison | Jim F. Barksdale | Stephen Bollenbach | Jeff Bewkes | Frank J. Caufield | Robert C. Clark | Mathias Döpfner | Jessica Einhorn | Michael Miles | Ken Novack | Richard Parsons | Deborah Wright

Subsidiaries
Former Subsidiaries
Library
People


v - e - d
Warner Bros. Home Entertainment logo
Editions
Animated Feature Films
Live-Action Feature Films
Animated shorts
Television shows
Hanna-Barbera Classic Collection
See Also



v - e - d
Warner Bros. Entertainment Shield Logo
Founders

Jack L. Warner | Harry Warner | Albert Warner | Sam Warner

Executives

Kevin Tsujihara

Theatrical Production Companies

Warner Bros. Pictures | Warner Bros. Family Entertainment | Warner Animation Group | New Line Cinema | Castle Rock Entertainment | Flagship Entertainment | Cartoon Network Movies

TV Production and Distribution

Warner Bros. Televison Productions UK | Eyeworks | Alloy Entertainment | Telepictures | Warner Bros. Animation | Warner Bros. Television | Warner Bros. International Television | Warner Bros. International Television Production

Broadcast TV

The CW

Cable TV Channels

Warner Channel | WB Channel

Warner Bros. Interactive Entertainment

Monolith Productions | TT Games (Traveller's Tales | TT Games Publishing | TT Fusion) | NetherRealm Studios | Rocksteady Studios | Turbine | WB Games Montréal

DC Entertainment

DC Films | DC Comics (Mad | Vertigo)

Home Video

Warner Home Video | Warner Archive Collection

Public Attractions

Warner Bros. Studio Tours | Warner Bros. Studio Tour London - The Making of Harry Potter | Warner Bros. Studio Tour Hollywood

Filming Studios

Warner Bros. Studios, Burbank | Warner Bros. Studio, Leavesden

Miscellaneous

Warner Bros. Digital Networks | Fandango Media | Turner Entertainment | WaterTower Music

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